Scientific Program

Day 1 :

  • Nursing Education
Speaker
Biography:

Prof. in Biostatistics in the College of Medicine, King Fahad Medical City. Prof. Bahnassy has a vast experience in both teaching and research. He is teaching Biostatistics, Research Methodology, Advanced Epidemiology and Evidence Based medicine. He has more than 150 published manuscripts in many reference journals. He is a statistical editor in many journals including WHO. He supervised more than 100 PhD, Master and fellowship thesis. He is conducting and participating in more than workshop yearly in both national and international levels

Abstract:

The use of health information system is increasing and there is  substantial evidence suggesting that the successful implementation of HIS in hospitals is significantly related to nurse’s satisfaction and attitudes. In Saudi Arabia, no such studies -according to the author’s knowledge- have addressed this topic.Objectives includes1- Describe nurses’ attitudes and levels of satisfaction in using the medical center’s information system during their clinical practices. 2- Determine the importance HIS satisfaction domains among nurses in a Saudi tertiary care medical center.

A cross sectional study on 445 nurses working in a Saudi tertiary care medical center was conducted from February to June 2012. A stratified random sample with proportional allocation was used to select the study sample. A questionnaire was used to collect data about attitudes, levels of satisfaction and perceptions towards hospital information system usage. Descriptive and analytical statistics i.e. t-test or Mann-Whitney test, ANOVA or Kruskal–Wallis, correlation and regression were used in the analysis. P value < 0.05 was set as the significant level throughout the study.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Anahid Kulwicki joined the Lebanese American University in September 2016 as the dean of the Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing. She comes to LAU after serving as dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Anahid Kulwicki earned her B.S.N at the American University of Beirut and M.S.N and doctoral degrees from Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis. Her program of research focuses on the health of immigrant, refugee and minority populations. A hallmark of her work has been creative collaboration between public and private institutions across multiple disciplines. She established the first health research department for the Middle Eastern community in the US to promote health research and to serve as a conduit for other researchers. In addition, she established and arranged for funding for the first Arab community based programs for HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, infant mortality, and cardiovascular diseases. Her programs have been evidence-based and effective in improving the health care of the underserved immigrant and refugee populations. Her recognized expertise led to her appointment to the Michigan Governor’s Task Force on Minority Health. Institutions such as NIH, W. Kellogg, Blue Cross Blue Shield, and numerous local and state government agencies have supported her research.

Abstract:

There is growing evidence that access to high quality low cost health care services is a serious concern for health policy makers locally and globally and certainty for the public in general. The fact that increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, the changing demographics coupled with new and emerging diseases has added additional strain to the burgeoning health care cost and for greater need in transforming the health care system. The Institute of Medicine in its 2011 report “The  Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” reiterated the important role nurses play in providing high quality low cost care to the public by virtue of their close relationship with patients and their scientific knowledge of evidence based practice. The report specified that nurses can be full partners with other health care professionals and lead the improvement and redesign of the health care system and its practice environment. In its final analysis and recommendation, the Institute called for removing the scope-of-practice barriers for Advance Practice Registered Nurses, especially for the Nurse Practitioners, who have demonstrated a record of accomplishments in improving access to high quality cost effective health care to the public. The American Nurses Association along with the World Health Organization, the Carnegie Foundation, the National League for Nurses and the International Council of Nurses among many others had made similar recommendation in advancing the education of nurses so that they can fully perform their duties commensurate to their educational preparation.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Graduated from Faculty of Nursing, University of Jordan 1993. Had worked as Cardiac Registered Nurse in Jordan. Completed Master Degree in Education from University of Jordan on 1998. Completed another Master Degree in Critical Care from Ohio State University on 1999. Worked at Ministry of National Guards for Health Affairs (NGHA-Riyadh) on 2003 as Clinical Resource Nurse in Nursing Education till 2010. Then worked in NGHA (Madinah) as Supervisor for Safety and Quality till 2014. On 2014-2017 worked as Director of Nursing Education at Security Forces Hospital- Riyadh. On Jan 2018 has joined Nursing Education at King Fahad Specialist Hospital as Nursing Educator Manager Obtained Phd in Healthcare Administration on 2010 and worked as visiting Professor Assistant. Supervising all Saudi Nursing Students - Interns and graduates. Publications : one book "Cardiology for Registered Nurses" , 15 Abstracts and Papers. 3 Researches. Speakers at several international Symposia and conferences, Saudi Heart Association member as senior Regional Faculty for ACLS. Developed many courses and programs accredited by Saudi Council such as Cardiac Catheterization Upgrading Program, Invasive Hemodynamic Programs, "Medication Administration Course", "IV Therapy Course", "Preceptor Course", "Charge Nurse Course", "Burn Critical Care Course", "ER Nursing Course", "Pain Management Course", "Wound Care Management Course", "Neonatal Nursing Care', "Critical Care Course" and "Leadership and Management Course" and many Cross Training and Up skilling programs. Currently is developing a Case Management Post Graduate Diploma Program.

Abstract:

ï‚· Introduction: Confident seniors and unit level leaders are keys to health organizational success. Both the complexity of healthcare delivery & the responsibility placed on charge nurses have also increased (Thomas 2012). Increasing patient’s admission in the hospital requires front line leaders (Charge Nurses) to understand their roles, responsibilities and accountabilities.  
 
ï‚· Background:  Most of Healthcare Organizations believes that Charge Nurse is placed by default based on how long they had worked in the unit and who was on the schedule rather than as a result of deliberate planning and scheduling based on who was most prepared to lead the team but it was found that there was a degree of bias and favoritism. 
 
Recently, the Charge Nurse Role is considered as front line leader and most of the hospital had clearly stated their job descriptions and criteria that are but not limited to qualifications, experience, performance and communication skills. Furthermore, there are few hospital cited in the literature who are developing their charge nurses through a structured professional development plan. 
 
ï‚· Aim This paper showed a professional development project that aimed to prepare qualified nursing staff with sufficient managerial knowledge and skills that will enable them functioning efficiently and professionally in the clinical area. The professional development project adopted Transformative Learning Theory (Mezirowc 2010).   

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Furst is a nurse educator both within the hospital and academia. Her research centers on improving the practice environment to improve satisfaction and nurse retention.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) conferences were started in 1912 and have been an arena allowing physicians to review case studies in which errors occurred (Zavotsky, Ciccarelli, Pontieri-Lewis, Royal, Russer, 2016). The M&M conference design allows surgeons to conduct peer-review assessment of patient outcomes for improving patient care (Cromeens, Brilli, Kurtovic, Kenney, Nwomeh, & Besner, 2016). Nurses have largely been neglected when it comes to learning from complications and/or mistakes within the Operating Room (OR).  This project is an attempt to bridge that gap and improve performance by non-physician operative staff.

Methodology: This was a quasi-experimental repeated measures design. Participants attending the preliminary nursing M&M conferences were asked to complete a survey providing feedback. That information was used to initiate change followed by a secondary (post) data collection six months later. The survey questionnaire was used to assess the change in perception of the M&M conferences from the pre- to post-survey.  The questionnaires allow for matching before and after responses to assess the change.

Findings: Staff provided overwhelmingly positive response to the nursing M&M conferences. They reported an increase in their understanding of certain policies and procedures as well as communication and team-related aspects of the OR environment. Several participants commented on an increased feeling of inclusion.

Conclusion & Significance: Operating Room errors can lead to significant morbidity, mortality, and/or substantial monetary losses. Improving the understanding and practice of the non-physician staff as well as improving teamwork and communication can all positively impact patients and their outcomes.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Agnes K. P. Mak was graduated from the Nethersole School of Nursing, the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She worked as a registered nurse in the medical and surgical fields with experience specialized in gastroenterology and clinical teaching. In 2011, she attained her Master’s Degree in Nursing and changed her career path from clinical to nursing education. She is currently pursuing a Doctoral Degree in Education at the Northeastern University. Her research interests are nursing education, high-fidelity simulation, innovative learning, and aromatherapy.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: High-fidelity simulation (HFS) is a teaching method using full-scale, high-fidelity human patient simulators, virtual reality, or standardized patients to offer a high level of interactivity and realism for learners. In the recent decade, HFS has been adopted in many nursing programs to enhance nursing students’ self-confidence, critical thinking, and decision-making capacities. Since nurse educator demonstrates an essential role in HFS by acting as a facilitator, it is crucial to understand their genuine experiences and thoughts toward HFS as this area is still a paucity in research. The purpose of this study is to understand the experiences of nurse educators with HFS in baccalaureate prelicensure nursing programs in Hong Kong and how do they make sense of those experiences in terms of meaning, value, and future development of HFS in nursing education. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A qualitative study using narrative inquiry was adopted. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 8 participants invited from all the nursing schools in Hong Kong which offer baccalaureate prelicensure nursing programs. Knowles’ Theory of Andragogy and NLN Jeffries Simulation Theory were utilized to understand the participants’ personal experiences with HFS in nursing programs. Findings: Four common narrative threads are identified –  (1) accept HFS as an unavoidable trend in nursing education which creates experiential learning opportunities for students in response to the limited opportunities of clinical practicum; (2) concern about students’ engagement in HFS affected by learning initiative, level of fidelity, time, group size, and debriefing style; (3) acknowledge its potential to create multidisciplinary learning; (4) willing to accept a small percentage of clinical hours substituted by good quality HFS hours. Conclusion & Significance: The themes emerged inform and inspire every stakeholder’s awareness, contributing to the future development and planning regarding the integration of HFS in nursing curriculum.

 

Speaker
Biography:

 
Dr.Thank-God Okusun is working in the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria 

Abstract:

The paper explores the current situation and future development of collegiate nursing education and practice in Nigeria and their influence on health care. As the role of the nurses continues to expand, Nigerian nurses must be skillful in effectively using evidence-based and clinically relevant information to facilitate the best possible nursing care. Major issues and challenges in this regard are discussed with some recommendations on the way forward.

Speaker
Biography:

Catherine Haulesi Chiwaula is working in the Directorate of Nursing and Midwifery Services, Ministry of Health Head Quarters Lilongwe – Malawi. 

Abstract:

Low implementation of evidence based decision making (EBDM) among nurses in Malawi pauses a great risk for effective nursing care delivery. This compromises provision of safe, effective and quality care. The purpose of this concept analysis (CA) was to clarify the concept of EBDM to promote mutual understanding among nurses and provide precise operational definition in nursing care delivery. Walker and Avant’s strategic method of CA was used to analyse EBDM concept. The framework comprised of seven steps: selecting the concept; determining the aims of the analysis; identifying uses of the concept; determining, defining attributes; constructing a model, borderline and contrary case; identifying antecedents and consequences, and defining empirical referents. EBDM is defined as the process of applying research evidence in combination with clinical expertise in making nursing care decisions while integrating patients’ desires. EBDM comprises of the following attributes: gathering evidence; interpreting evidence and applying what has been learned from evidence in making nursing care decisions. Prior to EBDM, antecedents are: an answerable clinical question, availability of evidence and necessary equipment, nurses with necessary knowledge, skills and confidence to access evidence. This will eventually lead to anticipated consequences like: safe, effective, cost-effective, quality care which can lead to desired patient outcomes. In conclusion, this analysis has clarified the definition and the approach to EBDM as: gathering evidence; interpreting evidence and applying what has been learned from evidence in making nursing care decisions. However, further studies are needed to try out the actual EBDM process and its attributes.