Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Rabiee Al Rashdi

Oman Academic Accreditation Authority, Oman

Keynote: Understanding and implementing EBP to foster and maintain safe and competent care

Time :

Biography:

Dr. Rabiee Al Rashdi graduated as a general nurse from the UK in 1987 before joining the Sultan Qaboos Military Academy from which he graduated as an Officer and then returned to UK to specialize in Accident and Emergency, Flight Nursing, as well as Intensive Care. Worked as a Nursing Officer in various military hospitals and climbed up the professional career ladder to finally become the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) of the Armed Forces Medical Services, Oman. He served in this demanding post for over 12 years, then he was appointed as the Commandant (Dean) of AFMS School. Dr Rabiee left the military healthcare services at the beginning of 2015 and is currently working as Planning and DevSelopment Expert in the Oman Academic Accreditation Authority where he is involved in strategic and Operational Planning; Development of Policies; Quality training and Audits; and Risk management. Dr. Rabiee has a Masters Degree in Nursing and a Doctorate of Philosophy (PhD) from Napier University, Edinburgh (Scotland), with a focus on healthcare Human Resources Development and Management. He also holds a post doctorate diploma in strategic management and leadership from Oxford Business College, UK, as well as various leadership and management courses. To enhance his knowledge and expertise, Dr. Rabiee teaches and presents in various nursing and healthcare subjects; evidence based practice; quality and patients’ safety issues; human resources development; and Business Studies. Dr. Rabiee is a member of various professional bodies such as the United Kingdom Nursing & Midwifery Council; the Canadian Healthcare Accreditation Body (as a surveyor); the Oman Nursing Association; and the Omani Higher Education Quality Network (OQNHE) in which he was for 2 years a member of the executive committee. Dr. Rabiee has a great interest in Higher Education and Healthcare Quality; Strategic Planning; Organizational Excellence; Human Resources Planning and Development; Patients Safety & Quality Care; Research & Evidence Based Practice; Healthcare Law & Ethics; and Professionalism.

Abstract:

Several definitions exist for the ‘Evidence Based Practice’ (EBP) concept, but the most commonly cited definition, according to Boyce et al (2018), comes from Dr. David Sackett in his 1996 letter in BMJ on what evidence-based medicine is and is not. In the letter, he described EBP as “the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients (Sackett, et al, 1996).

According to Mackey and Bassendowski (2017) Evidence Based Practice evolved from Florence Nightingale in the 1800s to medical physicians in the 1970s, and the nursing profession in the late 1990s. It began as an idea to provide better outcomes for patients who experienced deplorable, unsanitary, conditions and developed from this foundation to a widely communicated and critically needed practice for fostering and maintaining safe and competent care.

The critical need of Evidence Based Practice stems from the fact that, despite its development and wide interest to adapt it in nursing and other healthcare professions, there is still a wide variation in healthcare practices that ultimately lead to un-necessary wastage of resources, wasted care delivery time and efforts, as well as poor treatments and nursing care outcome (Youngblut and Brooten, 2001).

In response to the aforementioned status quo of Evidence Based Practice, commissioners and providers of healthcare were encouraged to implement it in order to utilize resources, improve the outcome of treatment and care delivery and meet public demands for cost effective and high standards of care. In this keynote presentation, the author aims to answer the following key questions: what is Evidence Based Practice and what is it not?; why is Evidence Based Practice needed in healthcare?; what is the best way of implementing Evidence Based Practice?; what are the hindering factors in implementation of Evidence Based Practice?; and how to overcome the hindering factors and enhance the implementation of Evidence Based Practice?.

Keynote Forum

Madhavi Rane Chikhale

Asian Heart Institute and Research Center, India

Keynote: Nurse, physical ill health : Self care given second priority being a Nurse

Time :

Biography:

Mrs.Madhavi has her expertise in training and evaluation. She has proposed, planned and commissioned Simulation lab for 8 hospitals in Maharashtra, India. She has 20+ years experience in healthcare, which is from corporate, state run hospitals and NGOs like Lilavati Hospital & Research Centre,Sir.HN Reliance foundation Hospital, Sir J J Group of hospitals ,Sahyadri Hospitals , Operation Smile and Asian Heart Institute. She has done her Post Graduate Nursing Management studies from London, also is certified for insertion of cvad from Tata institute and completed her MBA I Healthcare from ITM, Mumbai. She has worked as a bedside nurse since 1999-2006.And went on to upgrade her role as a nurse from being a Team leader to Director of Nurssing and also a Group HEAD for largest chain of hospitals in Maharashtra. Mrs.Madhavi is an ultra runner too, she has done several ultra runs ,and longest being 160km Mumbai to Pune Run in Nov 2017.She was the 1st Nurse in India to have attempted such a feat. She is an ambassador for Pinkathon and inspires thousands of women to care for their health. Motivates them by conducting/Facilitating free trainings every Saturday in Mumbai, Pune and London Above all she is a proud mother of 2 kids; her son is doing his NDA preparation.

Abstract:

A study done on nurses in service since 1999 till 2005 revealed that the backbone of any hospital wears off in 6th year of bed side nursing. Major reason for the same being not keeping self as priority, shift duties, being terminal care givers and absence of coping mechanism.

Visible dark circles under eyes, obesity, fake emotions, varicose veins, aching backbone and social disconnect are few of the effects experienced by the nurses all over the globe.

This study concludes that dealing with stress and ventilation mechanism along with self care with physical activities like running, exercise, yoga etc should be made mandate in the nursing training curriculum to enhance the health and keep the backbone of the healthcare system strong.

In India, nursing education is offered either through government-run hospitals or through privately-run clinics. Indian Nursing family advancing slowly towards making their mark in the globally by investing in quality improvement and self sufficiency

The nursing education curriculum includes all the vital and advanced processes of patient and family care.

Any individual undergoing this study is bound to make their career in healthcare.

But sadly, it doesn’t include the self care process for a nurse as she advances into the health care field.

There is no study which the nurse can refer to and learn the coping mechanism in case of the untoward experiences during their practice.

In long term it leads to many negligence towards oneself and pretence of being well.

 

Biography:

Maysoon Khalil Youssef's Career starts from 1999 with Al Istiklal Hospital as a Practical nurse at Jordan. With 10 years of journey she grow together with them to reach nursing supervisor. Meanwhile, work with university as a clinical instructor from 2007- 2009. Started work with Dr. Suleiman Hospital (KSA) as a Surgical Orthopedic unit charge nurse from 2009. Since 2011 they promoted as a Surgical Orthopedic unit Head nurse. She worked with them until 2014 same post. From 2014 promoted as a Head Nurse. Since 2016 Al Zahra Hospital (Dubai) working as a Director of Nursing. She earned Master degree in Health Care management from Dubai.

Abstract:

Introduction: In today’s digital age, several types of software and other time-saving solutions are on the market to help people achieve results in half the time. In the healthcare industry, that is no different. With the implementation of eMAR (Electronic Medication Administration Records), those in the healthcare industry can help patients in a fraction of the time and with less errors.

Objectives: A Medication Administration Record or MAR is the report that serves as a legal record of the drugs administered to a patient at a facility by a health care professional. eMAR (eMAR for electronic versions) an innovative and integrated solution to medication administration. This application provides staff with secure and convenient access to patient medication records, allowing for real-time recording, collection and reporting of data. Electronic medication administration records (eMar) enlist bar coding technology to submit and fill prescriptions with hand-held scanners that read bar codes and transmit them to the terminal/workstation using Bluetooth wireless technology. The eMAR relays drug dosage data to the pharmacy, which is then connected to nursing stations.

The following prescription data is included in eMars: Medication dosages, number of refills Medication types Medication classifications Patient refill history Real-time prescription status tracking capabilities

Criteria: Reducing adverse drug events is vital to all healthcare organizations, Implementing the Electronic Medication Administration Record (eMAR) helps ensure the Five Rights of Medication Safety: that the right patient receives the right drug at the right dose, at the right time, with the right method of administration.

According to CMS, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, eMAR(s) should enable the user to electronically verify the following before administering medication(s):

•(A) Right patient. The patient to whom the medication is to be administered matches the medication to be administered.

•(B) Right medication. The medication to be administered matches the medication ordered for the patient.

•(C) Right dose. The dose of the medication to be administered matches the dose of the medication ordered for the patient.

•(D) Right route. The route of medication delivery matches the route specified in the medication order.

•(E) Right time. The time that the medication was ordered to be administered compared to the current time.

 

Keynote Forum

Adel S. Bashatah

King Saud University Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Nursing Education in Saudi Arabia: A 60 years of obstacles and Opportunities

Time :

Biography:

Adel S. Bashatah is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Nursing Education & Administration, College of Nursing, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Abstract:

Nursing is a well-recognized profession in Saudi Arabia. Since the 1950s, Nursing in Saudi Arabia has faced many obstacles and challenges in reforming education and practice among Saudi community. The low number of schools and nursing programs at the Bachelor level paired with a high number of Diploma schools, has influenced nursing outcomes in both education and practice. In 2005, a higher education transformation began with a huge number of schools and universities supporting Nursing Education and Practice. Higher education scholarships, International Education, and the diversity of future qualified nurses in Saudi Arabia will influence the nursing profession at large. Alternatively, the nursing councils and nursing societies should support such a reform with all governmental support. Yet, with a growing number of educated nurses without a clear vision of the nursing profession’s needs led to the poor outcome of nursing practice and nursing image at large. Moreover, the revolution of higher education in health specialties including nursing has increased the number of programs up to 25 nursing programs with an average of 1000 students per year. With the governmental support and expected development, questions have been raised concerning the role of organizations and associations in supporting nursing development. The purpose of this study is to discuss the history of Saudi Nursing Education identifying the obstacles, challenges, and opportunities of creating qualified new nurses to be ready in the field of care.

Keynote Forum

Abdulelah Alhaidary

king Abdul aziz University Hospital Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Critical Care Nurses' Perspectives toward Family Presence during Resuscitation

Time : 14:00-14:40

Biography:

Experienced Director Services with a demonstrated history of working in the hospital & health care industry. Skilled in Clinical Research, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Patient Safety, Critical Care Nursing, and Hospitals. Strong education professional with a Diploma focused in Critical Care Nursing from King faisal hospital & research centre.

Abstract:

Introduction: Most of our hospital in Saudi Arabia are not allowing the family members to be presence during resuscitation of their loved one, because of many reasons, specifically the traumatic experience for the family members when they witness the resuscitation of their loved one and the unavailability of the space in the patient's room during the resuscitation, although in north America , Australia, and Europe there were a new movement has evolved gradually because of subjective evidence from family members supporting the notion of family presence during resuscitation in addition to emerging evidence from research by health professional,   add to that,  it was never investigated in Saudi Arabia , and if it will be done, it will diffidently add a lot to the practice and to the family members satisfaction.

Objectives: To answer the following : What are the profile of the respondents, to what extent of the prospective of critical care nurses toward family presence during resuscitation , is there a significant relationship between the level of perspectives of the respondents and their profiles, and to propose a well established family presence during resuscitation guidelines. 

Methods: the study was conducted in Intensive Care unit , Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia , from January to December 2016, this study involved 150 critical are nurses. it utilized the descriptive and qualitative methods of research. questionnaires were distributed and data obtained were assessed statically and presented with interpretation.

Result: the tabulated data were subjected to percentage, weighted mean, analysis of variance and t-test for two independent sample. results supported the family presence during resuscitation as a right not an option, permission should be secured, spiritually showed benefit. trauma was considered inevitable.

  • Nursing Education
Speaker
Biography:

Fatma Slem has her expertise in management and staff supervision. Strong desire to focus on supervision care and health education. skillful in ICU work utilizing my skills and experience to advance my career. Strong desire to learn more and have an effective role.

Abstract:

Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is defined as pneumonia that occurs 48-72 hours or thereafter following endotracheal intubation, characterized by the presence of a new or progressive infiltrate, signs of systemic infection (fever, altered white blood cell count), changes in sputum characteristics, and detection of a causative agent. VAP contributes to approximately half of all cases of hospital-acquired pneumonia. VAP is estimated to occur in 9-27 % of all mechanically ventilated patients, with the highest risk being early in the course of hospitalization. It is the second most common nosocomial infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the most common in mechanically ventilated patients. VAP rates range from 1.2 to 8.5 per 1,000 ventilator days and are reliant on the definition used for diagnosis. Risk for VAP is greatest during the first 5 days of mechanical ventilation (3 %) with the mean duration between intubation and development of VAP being 3.3 days. This risk declines to 2 %/day between days 5 to 10 of ventilation, and 1 %/day thereafter. Earlier studies placed the attributable mortality for VAP at between 33-50 %, but this rate is variable and relies heavily on the underlying medical illness. Over the years, the attributable risk of death has decreased and is more recently estimated at 9-13 % largely because of implementation of preventive strategies. Approximately 50 % of all antibiotics administered in ICUs are for treatment of VAP. Early onset VAP is defined as pneumonia that occurs within 4 days and this is usually attributed to antibiotic sensitive pathogens whereas late onset VAP is more likely caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria and emerges after 4 days of intubation. Thus, VAP poses grave implications in endotracheally intubated adult patients in ICUs worldwide and leads to increased adverse outcomes and healthcare costs.

Speaker
Biography:

Louie Pinuela Hijalda, Ph.D., RN, is currently a clinical instructor at the University of San Agustin, College of Health and Allied Medical Profession. A member of the Department of Science and Technology – Western Visayas Human Resource Development Committee (DOST–WVHRDC) and University of San Agustin – Research Ethics Review Committee.

Abstract:

Background. Higher Educational Institutions in the Philippines faced low program demand and pressure on competitive advantage because of the full implementation of K-12 and advent of Outcomes-Based Education; downsizing as one of the most popular strategies being used in an effort to compete in the current educational system scenario.

Methodology. The study employed a descriptive-correlational design utilizing a survey method. Qualitative data were obtained to enrich survey results. Ninety-one (91) nurse educators in various College of Nursing in Western Visayas were chosen as actual participants using a stratified random sampling. Data collected were analyzed using appropriate descriptive, inferential statistics and qualitative analysis.

Results. The results showed that majority of participants were 41 years old and above (65%), female (88%), married (88%), with master’s degree (81%), with a monthly salary of Php21, 000.00 and above (51%), having more than 10 years of service (78%) and assigned in both classroom and related learning experience (69%). The overall interpretation indicates a moderate level of job satisfaction (grand mean of 3.81) and organizational commitment (grand mean of 4.20) among nurse educators in Western Visayas; there is no significant relationship between organizational commitment versus profile variables except for area of assignment (χ2 = 16.217, p = 0.013). There is a significant relationship between job satisfaction versus organizational commitment (χ2 = 100.2, p = 0.000).

Conclusions. The study concluded that nurse educators’ perception of organizational downsizing has little effect on their job satisfaction and organizational commitment and that organizational downsizing has no significant relationship to job satisfaction and organizational commitment among nurse educators in Western Visayas.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Baloyi is a faculty member in the School of Nursing, College of Health Sciences at the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal, Durban, South Africa. Her research focusses on midwifery with specific interest midwifery education. In her Ph.D., she developed a model to guide the development of clinical reasoning skills within undergraduate midwifery students. She also has a passion for qualitative and grounded theory research. Dr. Baloyi is the author of 4 peer-reviewed articles all published in International Journals. As an emerging academic, Dr. Baloyi is supervising two (2) Ph.D. students and four (4) Masters.  

Abstract:

Clinical reasoning (CR) remains central in midwifery care in the light of uncontrollable high maternal mortality rates and errors in midwifery practice. However, there is no consensus, locally and internationally, on how clinical reasoning skills can be developed in undergraduate students particularly within midwifery context. Aim: This study analysed the processes used to develop clinical reasoning skills within undergraduate midwifery students with the aim of generating a middle-range theory for the production of competent midwifery graduates for optimum patient outcomes. Qualitative and grounded theory approach, underpinned by Social Constructivism Paradigm, was used. Data were collected over twelve months, using multiple methods of observations, interviews and document analysis. The participants comprised of midwifery nursing students, the 2016 and 2017 cohorts as well as midwifery educators. A total of 16 focus group discussions and 12 individual in depth interviews were conducted. Methods and analysis: Data collection and initial data analysis occurred simultaneously using coding process, which comprised of three distinct phases (open coding, axial coding and selective coding), with constant comparative analysis at each phase. Ethical clearance was obtained from the University Ethics Committee, with the Protocol reference number HSS/1288/016D. Findings: Developing clinical reasoning skills emerged as the main concept in the middle-range theory that was generated in this study. This main concept was supported by major concepts, which included context, nature of the curriculum, clinical reasoning process, pillars including individual and system related outcomes. Discussion and Conclusion: Quality midwifery care is what is founded on the clinical reasoning abilities of the midwives. The process of developing clinical reasoning skills is a hypothesis-oriented inquiry, hinged by process-product, relevant and responsive curriculum.

  • Nursing Care
Speaker
Biography:

Anthony A Thompson was born on October 30th 1978, at Abia State Nigeria, obtained his Primary and Secondary Education between 1985 and 1997. He started my sales job with the Home and Family Health Education Service as an Independent Distributor. Currently a Registered Nurse with BNSc in view. A talented Public Speaker with Passion.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Patients who are in pain due to illness or injury are being neglected by the less concerned attitude of the Nurses and other health care team. Often such patient are traumatized and regarded as regarded the painful experience as stressful. This issue has not been thoroughly examined by Nurses, personal and cultural bias and communication gap between patients and health care team have contributed to the book log in patients’ pain management.

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent of the level of education, work experience and ward of practice on the Utilization Pattern of Pain Assessment Tools Among Nurses.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A descriptive design methods was adopted for this study and a convenient Sampling technique was used to select a total of 100 Nurses caring for patients in a State Hospital in Nigeria. And theory of planned behavior / reason actions was used to analyzed behavioural intention (BI), attitude and subjective norms (BI=A+ SN).

Results: Data obtained reveal that there is no significant different (P=0.05) between level of education and utilization of pattern of pain assessment tools among Nurses. Also there is no significant difference (P=0.05) between year of experience and utilization pattern of pain assessment tool among Nurses. However, a significant difference (p=0.000) was recorded between ward of ward of practice and utilization pattern of pain assessment tools among Nurses.

Conclusion: Level of education and years of experience of Nurses does affect the utilization pattern of pain assessment tools among Nurses. However, ward of practice could be potential factor affecting the utilization pattern of pain assessment tool among Nurses.    

 

Speaker
Biography:

Louie Pinuela Hijalda, Ph.D., RN, is currently a clinical instructor at the University of San Agustin, College of Health and Allied Medical Profession. A member of the Department of Science and Technology – Western Visayas Human Resource Development Committee (DOST–WVHRDC) and University of San Agustin – Research Ethics Review Committee.

Abstract:

Background: Globally, the Lupus Foundation in America estimates that 1.5 million Americans and at least 5 million people worldwide suffer from SLE. In the Philippines, there is an estimated 443,891 among the population and the increasing number identified is getting more serious and is difficult to deal with.

Methodology: A descriptive phenomenology, qualitative research, with six participants involved. The guide questions were divided into four aspects: physical, psychological, social and spiritual lived experiences and health related quality of life. The rigor and validity of the study was achieved through engagement with the data, verification with feedback, use of extracts from verbatim account and peer debriefing. The data analysis involved the use of Colaizzi methodological approach.

Results: Main themes surfaced as similar among participants in their journey towards independence, acceptance, family support and faith and trust to God. At first, they really had a hard time accepting their disease condition but later on, they come to adapt to its changes and keep moving forward and learned lessons from it. They spend their time thinking about how to live their life normally. Medications and therapies were essential parts and the prolonged compliance to medications entailed side effects which the client cope up.

Conclusion: Participants made strategies on how to control, ease or relieve the suffering brought about by their physical, psychological, social and spiritual distress. Their faith, hope and trust in God even strengthened after knowing the disease.

 

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Asma Hussein Rammal

Madina National Hospital Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Quality in decision-making

Time :

Biography:

Miss Asma Hussein Rammal completed Master in Health Services Management from Yarmouk University and Royal Collage of Surgeon, BSc in Nursing from University of Jordan. 12 years in Management level; 3years as Nursing Director in Madina National Hospital. 7 years as Specialized Supervisor for Operating Theatre with Doctors without boarder, 2 years as Nursing Supervisor in International Medical Center. One academic year as Clinical Instructor in Arabia Collage in Amman. Almost 8 years as Operating room Nurse in 3 different hospitals in Jordan and Saudi Arabia

Abstract:

Quality in decision-making is a very crucial issue in nursing. Since nurses have the voice to lead, strong leaders should support this leading. In order to have strong leaders, they should have the proper knowledge and enough experience in the field. Multiple factors affect the decisions; outside factors and inside factors. The outside factors include the rules and regulations of MOH, labor law, accredited organizations and the other hospital (competitors). Inside Factors; like policies and procedures of the hospital, the shortage of staff and the support of the higher management. Despite all these factors the quality of care and patient safety should have the priority when making the decision otherwise; it will affect the health of the patient. For instance, when the decision was made to transfer patients from ICU to the medical ward because their health status was improved a little but they did not reach the level of being in the normal ward. Their health status was deteriorated and they were sent back to ICU. This type of decision has lots of side effect; 1- It did not take the quality of care in consideration. 2- This decision will affect the reputation of the hospital other than the legal situation that will affect the hospital. Other decision can be taken by higher management to increase the ratio of patient to nurse especially in critical areas other than the ward patient. In this situation, the Nursing Director can stop this decision. In order to prevent medical mistakes, work overload on nurses, which in turn will increase the sick leave.

Nursing Directors who considered the leaders for the new nurses should present strong leadership with justified decisions that reflect the quality of care that should have the priority.

Keynote Forum

Ntombi Khaya Msimango

Muscat Governorate, Oman

Keynote: Understanding the need, value and role of Midwives in Healthcare

Time :

Biography:

Experienced Midwife with a demonstrated history of working in the hospital & health care industry. Skilled in Management, Customer Service, Strategic Planning, Healthcare, and Leadership. Experienced Private Practitioner focused on Water Birth delivery, baby friendly care and alternative non pharmacological pain relief. Strong healthcare services professional with a Bachelor's degree focused in Community Health, Midwifery, Psychiatry. Registered Nurse from University of Johannesburg

Abstract:

Increasing women’s access to quality midwifery has become a focus of global efforts to realize the right of every woman to the best possible health care during pregnancy and childbirth (WHO, 2018).

Midwifery is one of the most ancient practices in the world. It even features in early Egyptian and Roman scrolls. Its popularity had decreased and is now seeing an increase in global attention.

Globally, there have many reports on the increased demand of midwives as well the shortage of these midwives.  In 2018, the department of health and social care in the UK reported that more than 3000 training course places would be created over the next 4 years in the “largest ever” investment in midwifery training, as part of the plans to meet NHS staffing demands.  The Royal College of Midwifery chief executive and general secretary Gill Walton said:” This is a very long overdue acknowledgment by the government that England’s maternity services need more midwives.”  In addition to this, the World Health Organization has stated on numerous occasions that more midwives are needed to improve maternal and newborn survival.

In 2011, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) published a report – The state of the world’s midwifery 2011: delivering health, saving lives- that offered a comprehensive look at midwifery around the globe.  The reports analysis of 58 countries showed that there was a global shortage of an estimated 350 000 midwives, at least a 3rd of whom were needed in the world’s poorest countries.

Midwifery has come to the fore since maternal and newborn health was made the focus of the two Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s).  In 2006, the World Health Organisation estimated that the world needs 4.2 million more health workers, with 1.5 million of those needed in African countries alone.  The State of the World’s Midwifery (SoWMy) 2014 report, which examines the global midwifery landscape across 73 low-and-middle -income countries, calls for urgent investment in high- quality midwifery to prevent about two-thirds of all maternal and newborn deaths- saving millions of lives every year.  Therefore, one can gather that the world is facing an acute shortage of healthcare workers.

However, midwifery experts say that for a profession that is so old, it is remarkably poorly understood.  Midwives do far more than just catch babies. The impact that midwives have is not just on pregnancy outcomes, but extends to newborn care, breastfeeding, family planning, and sometimes also cervical and breast cancer screening.  Decades of neglect of the role of midwives, either because of the over-medicalization of pregnancy care or a lack of resources, has left a legacy of high rates of maternal and newborn mortality in developing countries (Bulletin of the World Health Organisation, 2013).

According to ITV News report in n2018, women who use the continuity model of care in the UK are 19% less likely to miscarry and 16% less likely to lose their baby and 24% less likely to give birth prematurely.  This report was based on the provision of a dedicated team of midwives that will be with the mother from pregnancy to labor to new parent.  In addition, statistics are clear that having a dedicated team of midwives reduces the occurrence of stillbirths, miscarriages and neonatal death.

  • Nursing Education, Evidence Based Practice, Oncology Nursing, Cardiology Nursing, Nurse Practitioner, Helathcare
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Gracila V. Ucag-Decena is a registered nurse from Philippines. She completed her Master of Arts in Nursing in Arellano University with taken courses from University of the Philippines Open University. She is a graduate of Doctor of Philosophy (Educational Management) of University of Perpetual Help System, Philippines. She worked as nursing lecturer/ clinical instructor since 2004 and has been an effective lecturer of Medical-surgical Nursing and Nursing Research.

“I believe that students will achieve academic success and build the self-confidence to continue taking risks during the learning process, by enthusiastically engaging student in fascinating lessons. I also believe that learning occurs when a student is fully engaged in the process makes a personal connection with the information taught and applies the knowledge to a variety of experiences. I aim to provide students with a high quality of instruction that meets the individual needs of my students. And to have a legacy which other teachers and students will remember that I WAS A SINCERE INDIVIDUAL WITH A TRUE PASSION OF MY CRAFT, WHO ALWAYS CAME EARLY OR STAYED LATE TO HELP A STRUGGLING STUDENT SUCCEED”

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: This study aimed to evaluate the application of critical thinking skills in the context of nursing process of the nursing students.  It sought answers to the following specific problems: (1) What are the frequency applied in critical thinking skills as perceived by the student-respondents and as evaluated by clinical instructor-respondents in the context of Assessment; Diagnosis; Planning; Implementation; and Evaluation? (2) Is there any significant difference between the student-respondents’ perceptions and the evaluation of the clinical instructor-respondents on the application of the critical thinking skills in the context of nursing process? (3) What measures can be proposed to enhance the application of critical thinking skills of nursing students? Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: This study applied the mixed method of research and utilized the descriptive design for each quantitative aspect and content analysis for each qualitative aspect. This research was based on the humanistic nursing theory combined with the elements of critical thinking from the more recent studies. It adopted the Transactional Model of Critical Thinking (TMCT) which had successfully integrated humanistic nursing theory into a model of critical thinking. Findings: Based on the quantitative data, student-respondents perceived that they ALWAYS APPLY critical thinking skills and clinical instructor-respondents evaluation showed students only OFTEN APPLY critical thinking skills needed in all phases of nursing process (assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation and evaluation). Based on the qualitative data (NCP analysis), student-respondents need to enhance assessment process skills to ensure a complete database; formulated inappropriate  diagnosis; need to enhance skills in formulating goals and outcomes; have the skills in identifying appropriate nursing but  need to know how to prioritize each identified nursing intervention, and with skills in evaluating the effectiveness of interventions. Conclusion & Significance: There is a significant difference in the application of critical thinking skills in the context of nursing process as perceived by student-respondents and as evaluated by clinical instructor-respondents. Specific measures must be proposed to enhance the application of the critical thinking skills of nursing students in the context of nursing process.

Speaker
Biography:

Experienced Medical Surgical Nurse who completed his master degree at the University of Khartoum. He obtained Ph.D. in Medical-Surgical Nursing from National Ribat University. Currently, he is a Lecturer with 10years of experience at Nyala University  

Abstract:

Background: Sudan is considered one of the leading countries in Africa for the prevalence of hypertension. However, a proper national registry on hypertension is not available in Sudan and evaluation studies are rarely done. Nevertheless, a recent study showed an increase in incidences of hypertension in Sudan.The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, which is rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods, significantly lowers the blood pressure

Objective: To examine the effectiveness of dietary approach to reduce hypertension (DASH) in reduction of high blood pressure among hypertensive patients.

Design:  This research is an interventional case control community base study which was carried in 100 patients; 69 of them females and 31 males whom were selected by convenient sampling method. They were divided into two groups by simple random sampling 50 patients assigned in the case group and 50 in control group then followed every one separately for ten months.

Intervention: The case group were taught individually about dietary approach to reduce hypertension DASH and each participant in case group possessed a book for teaching program to eat food low in saturated fat, cholesterol, total fat and emphasizes fruits, vegetables, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products; then blood pressure measured monthly for both case and control group for ten month.

Result: The study shows decreasing in systolic blood pressure among patients who followed dietary approach and received teaching significantly in 4th month (p= 0.032) and diastolic blood pressure became significantly in 6th month (p=0.032) and became more significant in next four months without change in control group.

Conclusion: The study concluded that a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods, reduced saturated and total fat can substantially lower blood pressure.

Recommendation: It is necessary to apply a nutritional approach among all hypertensive patients because it could minimize both the health care workload and the money cost for therapy in clinical area.

John Nyah Mbout

Emirates National Health Services/Emirates Hospitals, UAE

Title: Cultural influence in communication and nursing care: The case of UAE
Speaker
Biography:

Over five years’ experience in providing compassionate nursing services to patients of different backgrounds. Highly skilled in assessing patient’s physical and mental health by conducting interviews. Hands-on experience in evaluating and treating patients using advanced technology and practices. In-depth knowledge of formulating plans of care and establishing priorities necessary to achieve outcomes. Well-versed in evaluating care-plan to see if amendments need to be applied to the current plan

Abstract:

The increasing diversity of the nation brings opportunities and challenges for health care providers, health care systems, and policy makers to create and deliver culturally competent services. Cultural competence is defined as the ability of providers and organizations to effectively deliver health care services that meet the social, cultural, and linguistic needs of patients.

“Culture" refers to integrated patterns of human behavior that include the language, thoughts, actions, customs, beliefs and institutions of racial, ethnic, social, or religious groups (California Endowment, 2003). Every culture has beliefs about health, disease, treatment, and health care providers.

Health is a cultural concept because culture frames and shapes how we perceive the world and our experiences.

All cultures have systems of health beliefs to explain what causes illness, how it can be cured or treated, and who should be involved in the process. The extent to which patients perceive patient education as having cultural relevance for them can have a profound effect on their reception to information provided and their willingness to use it.

Business leaders know that intercultural savvy is vitally important – not just because they have to deal increasingly with globalization, but also because the work force within their own national borders is growing more and more diverse.

Intercultural communication in its most basic form refers to understanding how people from different countries and cultures behave, communicate and perceive the world around them. Given the growing multicultural population in the UAE, intercultural communication research is actively being applied in healthcare settings so that doctors and their staffs can relate effectively to their patients from diverse cultural backgrounds.

The United Arab Emirates houses a diverse and vibrant community. The residing population originates from a number of Arab tribes. Over the time, the existing community has started to diversify with the arrival of the Iranians in 1800`s, followed by Indians (both Muslims and Hindus), especially in Dubai due to its prosperous pearl market, given its location on the coastline.3  The Emirati Arabic culture is a perfect blend of the Islamic, Persian and even Indian culture. This is evident in the architecture, dressing norms, cuisines, folk dances, and the usage of certain words in everyday language.  But the Arabic Islamic culture remains the strongest, and the most obvious influence on the UAE community.

Delivering high-quality care to Muslim patients involves having an awareness of the ramifications of the Islamic faith and Islamic beliefs. Nurses need to understand the implications of spiritual and cultural values for clinical practice. They should be aware of the need for modesty and privacy, the appropriate use of touch, dietary requirements and use of medications.

For a better understanding, this presentation will provide a brief overview of the existing culture and beliefs in UAE, before wading into it influences in communication and nursing care

This concept will be presented in the following sub-topics:

1.The significance of the concept

2.Critical analysis of the concept

3.Overview of existing culture and beliefs in the UAE

4.Application and influence of the concept in nursing care in the UAE: culture as a competency and influence of religion

5.Way forward of the concept