Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Biography:

Prof. in Biostatistics in the College of Medicine, King Fahad Medical City. Prof. Bahnassy has a vast experience in both teaching and research. He is teaching Biostatistics, Research Methodology, Advanced Epidemiology and Evidence Based medicine. He has more than 150 published manuscripts in many reference journals. He is a statistical editor in many journals including WHO. He supervised more than 100 PhD, Master and fellowship thesis. He is conducting and participating in more than workshop yearly in both national and international levels

Abstract:

The use of health information system is increasing and there is substantial evidence suggesting that the successful implementation of HIS in hospitals is significantly related to nurse’s satisfaction and attitudes. In Saudi Arabia, no such studies -according to the author’s knowledge- have addressed this topic.

Objectives:

1- Describe nurses’ attitudes and levels of satisfaction in using the medical center’s information system during their clinical practices. 2- Determine the importance HIS satisfaction domains among nurses in a Saudi tertiary care medical center.

Methodology:

A cross sectional study on 445 nurses working in a Saudi tertiary care medical center was conducted from February to June 2012. A stratified random sample with proportional allocation was used to select the study sample. A questionnaire was used to collect data about attitudes, levels of satisfaction and perceptions towards hospital information system usage. Descriptive and analytical statistics i.e. t-test or Mann-Whitney test, ANOVA or Kruskal–Wallis, correlation and regression were used in the analysis. P value < 0.05 was set as the significant level throughout the study

Biography:

Dr. Anahid Kulwicki joined the Lebanese American University in September 2016 as the dean of the Alice Ramez Chagoury School of Nursing. She comes to LAU after serving as dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Anahid Kulwicki earned her B.S.N at the American University of Beirut and M.S.N and doctoral degrees from Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis. Her program of research focuses on the health of immigrant, refugee and minority populations. A hallmark of her work has been creative collaboration between public and private institutions across multiple disciplines. She established the first health research department for the Middle Eastern community in the US to promote health research and to serve as a conduit for other researchers. In addition, she established and arranged for funding for the first Arab community based programs for HIV/AIDS, domestic violence, infant mortality, and cardiovascular diseases. Her programs have been evidence-based and effective in improving the health care of the underserved immigrant and refugee populations. Her recognized expertise led to her appointment to the Michigan Governor’s Task Force on Minority Health. Institutions such as NIH, W. Kellogg, Blue Cross Blue Shield, and numerous local and state government agencies have supported her research.

Abstract:

There is growing evidence that access to high quality low cost health care services is a serious concern for health policy makers locally and globally and certainty for the public in general. The fact that increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, the changing demographics coupled with new and emerging diseases has added additional strain to the burgeoning health care cost and for greater need in transforming the health care system. The Institute of Medicine in its 2011 report “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” reiterated the important role nurses play in providing high quality low cost care to the public by virtue of their close relationship with patients and their scientific knowledge of evidence based practice. The report specified that nurses can be full partners with other health care professionals and lead the improvement and redesign of the health care system and its practice environment. In its final analysis and recommendation, the Institute called for removing the scope-of-practice barriers for Advance Practice Registered Nurses, especially for the Nurse Practitioners, who have demonstrated a record of accomplishments in improving access to high quality cost effective health care to the public. The American Nurses Association along with the World Health Organization, the Carnegie Foundation, the National League for Nurses and the International Council of Nurses among many others had made similar recommendation in advancing the education of nurses so that they can fully perform their duties commensurate to their educational preparation.

Biography:

Azwihangwisi Helen Mavhandu-Mudzusi is Full Professor at the University of South Africa. She is NRF C rated researcher and the winner of 2017 Distinguished Women Scientist Award. She was an HIV/AIDS coordinator at the University of Venda immediately prior, where she trained students and educators in basic HIV/AIDS information. She also trained educators in Limpopo Province in basic HIV/AIDS counselling skills for orphans and vulnerable children and is deeply involved in rural community service work, which includes HIV/AIDS awareness campaigns at rural secondary schools, churches and orphanages. 
Helen is a fellow of M.A.C. AIDS Fund Leadership initiative at Columbia University, the University of California and the Human Sciences Research Council of South Africa. 
She holds several diplomas, advanced diplomas and degrees in nursing, including an Honours and master’s degree. She is deeply involved in the advocacy and support for Lesbians, Gays, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) students in rural institutions of Higher Learning

Abstract:

Purpose: The South African Nursing Council requires every newly qualified professional nurse to perform remunerated community service in a public hospital for a period of one year. However, most newly qualified professional nurses request to be transferred to other hospitals before the end of their placement term. The study purpose was to gain the understanding of community service nurses experiences at Tshwane district Public hospital in South Africa.

Methods: The study utilised interpretative phenomenological analysis design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data from eleven purposively sampled community service nurses. Data were analysed using Smith’s interpretative phenomenological analysis framework for data analysis.

 

  • Nursing Education

Session Introduction

LaDonna Christy

Houston Methodist Hospital,USA

Title: Progressive Care Residency Program
Speaker
Biography:

LaDonna Christy, MSN, RN-BC, CCRN, has over 15 year’s professional nursing experience including clinical practice and leadership at Houston Methodist Hospital, Texas Medical Center. In her role as a Nursing Program Leader with a concentration in Critical and Progressive Care, she provides program development to improve the aspect of care in the critically ill setting. She has currently has published on the realm of hemodynamics and perfusion. She is currently working on developing a simulation based hemodynamic course that is 90% interactive and 10% instruction. LaDonna is also a part time nursing instructor and helps students to focus on the holistic care in nursing. She is certified in critical care nursing and nursing professional development and is committed to incorporating life long learning into nursing practice. LaDonna is currently working on her PhD at The University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, with a focus on early warning scores and clinical deterioration in the critically ill.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: A Progressive Care Unit is a unit that bridges the patient care continuum between critical care and medical surgical care needs. The American Association for Critical Care Nurses (AACN) purport the need for progressive care units to serve the patient population whose needs fall along that of the less acute but have the potential to become unstable (Stacy, 2011) (Hartjes, 2018). In line with the AACN, educational requirements to work within these specialized units include a higher level of skill acquisition to prevent the moderately stable patient from transitioning to critically unstable.  Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Kolb’s experiential learning theory was used as the framework to develop an integrated learning program, incorporating cognitive, psychomotor and affective learning strategies. A two-day, 8-hour program was designed. The program included an interactive presentation and group work didactic, along with simulated common patient events that require critical thinking and intervention, discussion with the participants, and debriefing performed by the educators. The learners that participated were graduate nurses working in progressive care setting at a metropolitan teaching hospital, nurses that currently work in progressive care at least one year or more, and graduate nurses working in community hospital intensive care unit with lower acuity patients. Findings: total of 244 participants completed the two-day program.  The pre-questionnaire identified that 50-65%% of the participants had minimal knowledge of hemodynamics and titratable medications associated with working in a progressive care unit. The post survey stated that partipipants increased comprehension of topics at a mean of 88.45%. Conclusion & Significance: Incorporating specialized training program for the graduate/new nurse transition to practice in a progressive care unit may improve the new nurse graduate’s/new nurse’s competence, ultimately effecting patient outcomes. 

Speaker
Biography:

Peter is currently a PhD candidate in business and health services interdisciplinary study at Fiji National University. He was formerly the senior manager of radiology department at Popondetta General Hospital, Papua New Guinea. He has 15 years of work experiences in the health sector apart from his role as branch president of allied health workers association for 9 years before pursuing his doctoral career

 

Abstract:

Employee empowerment is a valuable management tool used by organizations to improve and enhance performance. Whilst majority of the empowerment literatures concentrate on linear empowerment approach, the emerging multilevel (cross-level) empowerment has hardly gained research attention so far. Hence, this study used a multilevel model to examine employee empowerment in the health sector in Papua New Guinea and its link with perceived service quality. The study has adopted cross-sectional survey of 327 clinicians including nurses in four major hospitals in the country particularly Port Moresby, Kerema and Popondetta Genera Hospitals including Laloki Psychiatric Hospital between April and May, 2018. Multivariate regression and correlation analyses using EViews (statistical tool) show that structural empowerment and empowering leadership have a statistically significant influence on the employees’ psychology both at the individual and team (unit) levels, and in turn these have a significant influence on perceived service quality. Additional analysis of 22 dimensions of all five study variables (structural empowerment, empowering leadership, unit empowerment, psychological empowerment, and perceived service quality) indicate a generally weak to moderate empowering leadership practice in leading by example, participative decision-making, coaching, informing, and team interactive with an average of 3.5 on a 5-point rating. Furthermore, structural empowerment reveals that hospital employees have limited access to opportunity, information, support, and resources required to perform their roles with an average of 3.3 on a 5-point rating. Also, a reliable workforce was rated 3.7 whilst the appearance of employees and facilities including performance of equipment/materials rated 3.0 on a 5 point scale. The study outcome suggests implications for improvement by adopting multilevel empowerment frameworks to add value to the existing systems particularly within complex and dynamic hospital systems.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. ALMomani have  expertise in evaluation and passion in improving the health and wellbeing. He is open and contextual evaluation model based on responsive constructivists creates pathways for improving healthcare. He  expert in, evaluation, teaching , tanning and administration  both in hospital and education institutions. Eloquent and astute professional with an excellent background in the areas of Training and Development, Quality Improvement, and Accreditation, gained through hands on environments. Culturally diverse, flexible, and adaptable with the ability to work through challenging settings, aspiring to secure a position where I would be able to apply my expertise in service improvement, team building, and designing enriching programs according to my strong caliber and high competencies, and ultimately contributing to the success and growth of the organization.

 

Abstract:

The needs assessment findings. First, the care provider’s previous educational experiences in SBAHC will be discussed as well as the barriers and enablers. Second, the identified areas of learning needs will be summarized along with identified priority areas and preferred methods of learning. Third, care providers’ reports on signs of

Compassion fatigue in the workplace will be discussed as well as strategies that could be used to support self-care. Although there was a wide range of educational programs that were attended by participants, the most frequently accessed programs were the Fundamentals course (51.6% of all participants hadtaken the course), in-services provided by PDN however, had somewhat different use of available educational programs. For example, Training program most frequently while Nurses and Other Health Disciplines reported “Other” as one of their most frequent choices; indicating access to a wide range of possible education programs.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Furst is a nurse educator both within the hospital and academia. Her research centers on improving the practice environment to improve satisfaction and nurse retention.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) conferences were started in 1912 and have been an arena allowing physicians to review case studies in which errors occurred (Zavotsky, Ciccarelli, Pontieri-Lewis, Royal, Russer, 2016). The M&M conference design allows surgeons to conduct peer-review assessment of patient outcomes for improving patient care (Cromeens, Brilli, Kurtovic, Kenney, Nwomeh, & Besner, 2016). Nurses have largely been neglected when it comes to learning from complications and/or mistakes within the Operating Room (OR).  This project is an attempt to bridge that gap and improve performance by non-physician operative staff.

Methodology: This was a quasi-experimental repeated measures design. Participants attending the preliminary nursing M&M conferences were asked to complete a survey providing feedback. That information was used to initiate change followed by a secondary (post) data collection six months later. The survey questionnaire was used to assess the change in perception of the M&M conferences from the pre- to post-survey.  The questionnaires allow for matching before and after responses to assess the change.

Findings: Staff provided overwhelmingly positive response to the nursing M&M conferences. They reported an increase in their understanding of certain policies and procedures as well as communication and team-related aspects of the OR environment. Several participants commented on an increased feeling of inclusion.

Conclusion & Significance: Operating Room errors can lead to significant morbidity, mortality, and/or substantial monetary losses. Improving the understanding and practice of the non-physician staff as well as improving teamwork and communication can all positively impact patients and their outcomes.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Z. Llarena was born in Manila, Philippines. The author finished his BS Pharmacy degree at the University of Santo Tomas and graduated his MS Pharmacy at the University of the Philippines Manila. He used to work both in the pharmaceutical industry and academe as Assistant Professor and Program Chair of the Pharmacy Department in colleges and universities in the Philippines.

 

Abstract:

Anger is an emotional trauma experienced by a person inflicted with external harm, such as abusive words and experienced injustice by an individual. Its management can exhibit the degree of trauma felt by a person. A 33-year-old Asian man had experienced moral injury to the extent of losing significant weight in a span of 8 months resulting from being obese to a normal body mass index (BMI) as a result of his anger management. Exponential Injury Severity Score (EISS) in reference to Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) system showed that the 33-year-old Asian man had suffered severe injury with a score of 5.29 near to a 6.0 maximal score.

Keywords: trauma, anger management, emotional harm

 

Speaker
Biography:

Azjargal Baatar has her expertise in evaluation and passion in improving the health and wellbeing She has built this model after years of experience in research, evaluation, teaching and administration  both in hospital and education institutions. The foundation is based on fourth generation evaluation (Heinemann & Curran, 1999) which is a methodology that utilizes the previous generations of evaluation: measurement, description and judgment. It allows for value-pluralism. This approach is responsive to all stakeholders and has a different way of focusing.

 

Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to describe attitudes toward interprofessional education in Mongolia National University of Medical Sciences. Methods: Cross-sectional study, Heinemann et al (Heinemann, Schmitt, Farrell, & Brallier, 1999)1 developed the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale (ATHCTS, 21-item instrument), which has potential for evaluating clinically based team training programs as well as use a pre- and post-test tool for educational interventions with teams. A 14-item instrument in which items containing the word “physician” have been removed from the original instrument is a modified version adapted by Curran et al (Curran, Sharpe, & Forristall, 2007) to measure attitudes towards health care teams.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Kholoud ALHomoud has completed her MSc in Trauma and Orthopaedics :Spinal from university of Salford, UK. she is Senior physiotherapist and the director of Health education department at Convalescents Hospital, KSA, Riyadh. She has First Author of Systematic review in the Effectiveness of spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low-back pain and CO-Investigator in clinical research (Sacral Neuromodulation single centre experience) in King Fahad Medical City. she has a Member in Spine Society of Europe, Saudi spine society and Saudi Physical Therapy Association

 

 

Abstract:

Background: Many treatments exist for low-back pain (LBP). These include spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), which is a universal and widely practiced intervention.

Objective: To evaluate SMT effectiveness upon an individual’s pain, and the functional status on long-term.

Study Design: Systematic review.

Methods:  Search of multiple databases from June 2009 up to June 2017 for Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) studies. Two reviewers employed the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for evaluation of bias probability in independent rating of the selected studies.